Winnipeg Architecture Foundation

Places

Buildings

Medical Arts Building

Address:233 Kennedy Street
Use:Medical offices/retail
Original Use:Medical offices
Constructed:1972-74
Architects:Moody Moore Duncan Rattray Peters Searle Christie
Firms:Moody Moore Duncan Rattray Peters Searle Christie
Engineers:D.E. Cross (Structural)
R.I. Tibbs (Electrical)
Contractors:Bird Construction Ltd.
John A. Flanders Ltd. (Developer)

More Information

In 1971, local architectural firm Moody Moore Duncan Rattray Peters Searle Christie submitted a joint proposal, with Bird Construction, for the design and construction of the Medical Arts Building, 233 Kennedy Street. This unusual strategy (the first time it had occurred in Winnipeg) circumvents conventional practice, where the architectural firm responds to a proposal and the selected firm’s design is then bid on construction firms.

The Medical Arts Building that stands today is the second medical arts building. The first building was constructed in 1922 - 1923 and designed by John D. Atchison.

At the time of construction, The Medical Arts Building was the largest medical office in Winnipeg, and currently contains the offices of approximately 200 medical and dental practitioners. During the opening the building had two pharmacies and two optical dispensaries on the ground floor.

Design Characteristics

  • The Medical Arts Building is clad consistently on all four sides with buff-coloured concrete, punctured by narrow verticle glazing
  • The shape of the windows aim to admit light without compromising privacy; a louvered screen obscures two thirds of the structural opening
  • 233 Kennedy Street is linked to a parking structure via a pedestrian bridge
  • 15 storeys with underground parking
  • Concrete was supplied by ConForce Productions Ltd
  • Steel was supplied by Dominion Bridge
  • The second floor is connected to the neighbouring parkade, 218 Edmonton, by skywalk

Sources

  • "Medical building going up" Tribune, 24 February 1972.
  • "June Opening Date Set For Medical Arts Building" Winnipeg Free Press, 24 February 1974.